Isatu Kamara
       
     
 This project was in partnership with  We Yone Child Foundation  and  Photographers Without Borders .         
       
     
Memuna Kamara
       
     
Aminata Bangura
       
     
Aminata Conteh
       
     
Mohamed Bah
       
     
Fatamate Jalloh
       
     
Mahawa and Pa Morlai Kamara
       
     
Fatamata Kanu
       
     
Fatemate Kamara
       
     
Isatu Kamara
       
     
Isatu Kamara

A single mother of four children, Isatu now 50, lost her husband during the last Ebola outbreak and supports her family selling coal. She lives in the community of Kroo Bay a slum in central Freetown. She'd eventually like to move towards selling palm oil as coal has irritated her lungs and doesn't have as much earning potential.

 This project was in partnership with  We Yone Child Foundation  and  Photographers Without Borders .         
       
     

This project was in partnership with We Yone Child Foundation and Photographers Without Borders.

 

 

 

Memuna Kamara
       
     
Memuna Kamara

Memuna isn't sure how old she is but estimates she's in her early 50's. She sells watermelons in downtown Freetown to earn money to support her four children. As a single parent, it's difficult for her to stay on top of the school fees for her children's education, but she feels proud that she can be completely independent.

Aminata Bangura
       
     
Aminata Bangura

Aminata is a 17-year-old single mother. Her young son Dixon is nearly 2 and through a small business grant with We Yone Child Foundation she's been able to support him by selling rubber bowls. "The money is small right now," she says. "I want to grow my business into something big. I want to have an enterprise."

Aminata Conteh
       
     
Aminata Conteh

Aminata lives close to the polluted waterway that flows through the community of Kroo Bay. She earns her living selling thread for fishing which has helped to support her five children after she lost her husband during the last Ebola outbreak. She wants to expand her business so she can continue to maintain funding her childrens education.

Mohamed Bah
       
     
Mohamed Bah

Mohamed, 65, stands proudly inside his shop in the community of Kroo Bay. For 7-years he's been selling bread, coffee, milk and other goods to support his wife and five children. He's most proud that the income from his small business can fund his childrens education.

Fatamate Jalloh
       
     
Fatamate Jalloh

Fatamate sits next to her streetside business in the community of Kroo Bay while a local child stands next to her people watching. A mother of seven children, Fatamate's husband died from Ebola and afterward she created her business to support the family. She sells a variety of goods that change seasonally, which she says gives her a competitive advantage and a consitent income.

Mahawa and Pa Morlai Kamara
       
     
Mahawa and Pa Morlai Kamara

Wife and husband Mahawa and Pa Morlai stand outside their home in the community in Kroo Bay. They have five children and started a business selling African meat soup to support the family. They struggle to make enough income to cover the children's school fees but hope to expand their business by selling other foods.

Fatamata Kanu
       
     
Fatamata Kanu

Fatamata has a fry-fry business in the community of Kroo Bay that sells small fish, potatoes, eggs and sausage. After her husband died from Ebola she became the only income earner for her five children. She's managed to cover school fees and take care of her elderly mother while running the business.

Fatemate Kamara
       
     
Fatemate Kamara

Fatemate, 41,  sits with her 6-month-old son while her daughter behind feeds her 3-year-old. Fatemate has five biological children and cares for three additional kids. One whom she adopted into her home after finding her orphaned on the street after the last Ebola outbreak, and two of her brothers. With eight mouths to feed, Fatemate struggles to keep her small business selling water and soft drinks afloat.